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CUCM Special Characters

As you are all aware, the list of characters available to use when configuring various fields in CUCM depending upon the field type.  I chose CUCM 8.5 for my sample below as it is what I'm using mostly these days (and will be a quick reference when my memory is shot), but I'm sure some of you can contribute some differences in other versions in the comment section down below.

Be sure to click the "more" link - it goes to the big and juicy Cisco CUCM System Guide for tons of great details!

CUCM 8.5 Special Characters [ more ]



Character

Description

Examples

@

The at symbol (@) wildcard matches all NANP numbers.

Each route pattern can have only one @ wildcard.

The route pattern 9.@ routes or blocks all numbers that the NANP recognizes.

The following route patterns examples show NANP numbers that the @ wildcard encompasses:

• 0

• 1411

• 19725551234

• 101028819725551234

• 01133123456789

X

The X wildcard matches any single digit in the range 0 through 9.

The route pattern 9XXX routes or blocks all numbers in the range 9000 through 9999.

!

The exclamation point (!) wildcard matches one or more digits in the range 0 through 9.

The route pattern 91! routes or blocks all numbers in the range 910 through 91999999999999999999999.

?

The question mark (?) wildcard matches zero or more occurrences of the preceding digit or wildcard value.

The route pattern 91X? routes or blocks all numbers in the range 91 through 91999999999999999999999.

+

The plus sign (+) wildcard matches one or more occurrences of the preceding digit or wildcard value.

The route pattern 91X+ routes or blocks all numbers in the range 910 through 91999999999999999999999.

[ ]

The square bracket ([ ]) characters enclose a range of values.

The route pattern 813510[012345] routes or blocks all numbers in the range 8135100 through 8135105.

-

The hyphen (-) character, used with the square brackets, denotes a range of values.

The route pattern 813510[0-5] routes or blocks all numbers in the range 8135100 through 8135105.

^

The circumflex (^) character, used with the square brackets, negates a range of values. Ensure that it is the first character following the opening bracket ([).

Each route pattern can have only one ^ character.

The route pattern 813510[^0-5] routes or blocks all numbers in the range 8135106 through 8135109.

.

The dot (.) character, used as a delimiter, separates the Cisco Unified Communications Manager access code from the directory number.

Use this special character, with the discard digits instructions, to strip off the Cisco Unified Communications Manager access code before sending the number to an adjacent system.

Each route pattern can have only one dot (.) character.

The route pattern 9.@ identifies the initial 9 as the Cisco Unified Communications Manager access code in an NANP call.

*

The asterisk (*) character can provide an extra digit for special dialed numbers.

You can configure the route pattern *411 to provide access to the internal operator for directory assistance.

#

The octothorpe (#) character generally identifies the end of the dialing sequence.

Ensure the # character is the last character in the pattern.

The route pattern 901181910555# routes or blocks an international number that is dialed from within the NANP. The # character after the last 5 identifies this digit as the last digit in the sequence.

\+

A plus sign preceded by a backslash, that is, \+, indicates that you want to configure the international escape character +.

Using \+ means that the international escape character + is used as a dialable digit, not as a wildcard.

For more information on this character, see the "Using the International Escape Character +" section.



Field

Valid entries

Call Park Number/Range

[ ^ 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 - ] X * #

Calling Party Transform Mask

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 X A B C D * # +

Called Party Transform Mask

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 X A B C D * # +

Caller ID DN (Gateways and Trunks)

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 X * # +

Directory Number

\+ [ ^ 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 - ] + ? ! X * # +

Directory Number (Call Pickup Group Number)

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

External Phone Number Mask

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 X * # +

Forward All

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 * # +

Forward Busy

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 * # +

Forward No Answer

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 * # +

Meet-Me Conference Number

[ ^ 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 - ] X * #

Prefix Digits

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D * # +

Prefix DN (Gateways and Trunks)

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 * # +

Route Filter Tag Values

[ ^ 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 - ] X * #

Route Pattern

[ ^ 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D - ] + ? ! X * # + . @ \+

Translation Pattern

[ ^ 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D - ] + ? ! X * # + . @ \+

Hunt Pilot

[ ^ 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D - ] + ? ! X * # + . @ \+

Bonus Question


Can anyone tell me why "A B C D" are valid characters when configuring a route pattern in CUCM 8.5?

Answer:  [ source ]

There are 16 DTMF digits (arranged as four columns by four rows). In addition to the standard 12 keypad digits—0 to 9, *, and #—an additional four digits form an extra fourth column of digits called simply A, B, C, and D. Because the ABCD digits are unavailable on a normal phone keypad, you are unlikely to ever come across these for normal phone calls. They are used occasionally by voice mail systems to operate an intersystem exchange of voice messages between separate voice mail systems using a standard called Analog Message Interchange Standard (AMIS). 

Some security-type phones also use the ABCD digits for initial negotiation. You may also see these used where there is a need to create telephone numbers that cannot be directly dialed from a phone keypad. One example of this is if you want to create nondialable phone numbers for intercoms. You normally place an intercom call by pressing a button specifically configured for intercom (this works somewhat like a speed-dial button), so you do not need to be able to enter individual dialed digits.

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